Silver Falls with a Toddler.

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Archer at Silver Falls

Archer at Silver Falls

Just over two years ago this little man came into my life and since then I have been awaiting the day that I could share my love of the outdoors with him.

As such this is the beginning of a long anticipated series of walks that I will be sharing with Archer.

Silver Falls, Mount Wellington.

The first part of this walk is along the Pipeline Track departing from Fern Tree on the flanks of Mount Wellington. The suggested walking time is 15 minutes each way, with a toddler allow double that time.

Walk along the Pipeline Track for approximately 15 minutes making sure you pick up all the rocks, sticks and bits of bark that you find and exclaim “ROCK, DADDY ROCK” every 25-30 seconds. You will come to a long bend and a sign post pointing up hill to Silver Falls. Follow this track to the base of the falls, the track can be a bit slippery and for little legs could seem steep.

Take some photos and have a good look around, before retracing your steps back along the Pipeline Track.

With the aim of getting Archer used to carrying his own pack when walking (future proofing) he carried his own Mini Mac Macpac pack which contained some snacks, wipes, 2 nappies and his drink bottle.

Now when ever his pack comes out he says “BUSHWALK” and heads to the car.

Stay tuned for another walk next week!

Walls of Jerusalem

Below is a summary of a plan to tackle the high number of users inside the Walls of Jerusalem National Park. The Summary is Taken directly from the Parks and Wildlife Website  which can be found Here

SUMMARY

The Walls of Jerusalem is a majestic place in the heart of an alpine wilderness. It is the second-most popular backcountry walking destination in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, with 4-5000 visitors annually, and is a favoured area for beginner to intermediate walkers.

The area of greatest visitation, the 3,283 hectare Recreation Zone, is coincident with very high conservation values. It is a very scenic area which has, to date, remained relatively pristine despite high use. It is also an ecological refugia in light of potential climate change.
The iconic grassy pencil pine forests at Dixons Kingdom, the only such extensive communities in the world, are a good example of the coincidence of high scenic, recreational and conservation values in the Walls of Jerusalem area. Fire is a key threat to the area’s values, particularly the pencil pine communities and the scenic values of which they are a critical part. Hence priority conservation management issues are the exclusion of fire; the maintenance of sensitive natural values in the light of climate change; and maximising the naturalness of the area (including minimising trampling impacts and the maintenance of high water quality).
 Use of the area by commercial guided walking groups is significant and is likely to increase with increasing publicity. School outdoor education programs are also major users of the area. Both these user groups and some private groups can form large parties that can impact the experience of others.
The Recreation Zone contains more than 31 kilometres of walking tracks of which 6.5 kilometres has been hardened with timber or stone. Active deterioration is occurring on some unimproved track sections and campsites. Illegal campfire use is on the rise and, prior to installation of a temporary toilet at Dixons Kingdom, poor toileting practices were frequently noted.
The purpose of this plan is to describe management actions that aim to protect both the area’s high conservation values and the visitor’s experience. These actions include:
Tracks
Creation of a circuit loop. Relevant sections of the Dixons Kingdom – Lake Ball – Lake Adelaide track will be reclassified and upgraded, creating a circuit of track class T1 and T2. This allows a maximum party size of 13 throughout and creates a loop track option for large groups and commercial trips. This upgrade is a significant change to the present situation, and will require medium-long term track works (campsite upgrades, track re-routes and hardening).
Promotion of three types of Walls experiences. Once track and campsite upgrades are completed, it is proposed to promote specific day walk (to Wild Dog Creek and Central Walls), overnight walk (Wild Dog Creek and Dixons Kingdom) and a multi-day circuit walk (overnights at Wild Dog Creek, Dixons Kingdom and/or Lake Adelaide) experiences. The hardened side routes to the Temple, Solomons Throne and Mt Jerusalem will be incorporated in such promotion but other routes in the Walls of Jerusalem area will not be actively promoted.
Camping
New and expanded hardened campsites. The existing hardened camping area at Wild Dog Creek will be expanded and a new hardened camping area will be constructed at Dixons Kingdom. Another hardened campsite at Lake Adelaide is likely to be constructed in the medium term.
No camping in the Central Walls. Once these upgrades are complete, camping in the Central Walls area will be disallowed.
Visitor Management 
Track ranger presence. A track ranger presence is urgently required to redress increasing use of campfires, promote Leave No Trace principles and to educate users.
Education campaign. Appropriate educational messages will be distributed at both a site-specific level and more broadly.
Large group management. To address overcrowding issues, from the 2013-14 summer season, all groups of seven or more members will be required to register to visit or traverse the Recreation Zone.
Web-based booking system. Investigate the business case for a web-based booking system for all users.

Reinhold Messner

Image “badassoftheweek.com”

Reinhold Messner what more really needs to be said? a true icon and revolutionary in the climbing world, his feats are still something modern mountaineers seek to emulate and his philosophy changed the way man kind see the mountains.

Born on September 17 1944 Messner was introduced to climbing by his father at age five where he quickly developed a flair for the sport and being lucky enough to grow up in the Dolomite’s where he could refine his art he progressed quickly. From the age of 13 Messner was climbing difficult routes in the eastern Alps.

Messner became of the first people to climb in “Alpine Style” as opposed to the traditional method of climbing big mountain. Messner did away with the idea that climbing teams needed to stock a mountain with supplies and camps and employ Sherpa’s to carry loads up and down the mountain.

In 1970 Messner climber his first 8000m peak Nanga Parbat a peak that had already seen its fair share of tragedy and heart ache. This trip was no exception, as it was on this expedition that Messner lost his younger brother Gunther. Messner spent a considerable time looking for his brother on the mountain and as a result he suffered severe frostbite to his feet. the event has caused controversy over the years and still continues to do so. Not to be taken away is the feat of climbing Nanga Parbat’s southern wall for the first time.

On the 8th of May 1978 Messner along with long time climbing partner Peter Habeler climbed Everest without the use of oxygen canisters, the first to do so. Many people tried to convince them that it was a bad idea and that they would do themselves permanent damage if they tried.

Messner became the first person to “Close the loop” or climb all 14 mountains over 8000m in height. A feat that is still rare amongst mountaineers.

  • Everest                1978
  • K2                       1979
  • Kanchenjunga     1981
  • Lhotse                 1986
  • Makalu                1986
  • Cho Oyu              1983
  • Dhaulagiri 1         1985
  • Manaslu              1972
  • Nanga Parbat      1970
  • Annapurna 1       1985
  • Gasherbrum 1     1975
  • Broad Peak         1982
  • Gasherbrum 2     1984
  • Shishapangma    1981

Recently Messner has laid the final touches to the “Messner Mountain Museum” spread across various sites in the Alps.

In summary its fair to say that Messner is a remarkable man who has achieved more than most and continues to do so.

“After Messner, the mystery of possibility was gone;
there remained only the mystery of whether you could do it.”

– Ed Viesturs

 

Mt Wellington Snow

Todays weather with snow and rain reminded me of a walk I did a couple of weeks ago when the conditions were about the same.

The walk was designed to test out the new boots i purchased in Melbourne which I reviewed a couple of weeks ago.

The walk was a quick trip from the springs on Mt Wellington, Up the zig zag track to the summit and down the road back to the springs only a couple of hours really.

Wineglass Bay

A couple of weekends ago a spur of the moment trip to Freycinet national park presented itself. It was a quick overnight trip to blow out some cobwebs before starting a new job later that week.

Leaving Hobart at about lunch time we stopped at Kate’s berry farm near Swansea for a last coffee, then proceeded to Coles Bay to buy some cheese and were on the track at around 3:50 pm.

The walk up the saddle to the Wineglass bay lookout revealed some great views back to Coles bay and took about 30 minutes to reach the saddle. we then dropped down the other side and descended to Wineglass bay itself. We stopped for some chocolate and a drink before wandering the remaining 30 minutes up the beach to the campsite. Its worth noting that water can be hard to find at this end of the beach so we hauled in about 7 Liters of water ( a bit overkill). We set up camp in the fading light before heading down to the beach for make dinner and enjoy that chilli cheddar we got in Coles bay. all up the walk took about 1.5 hours including the stops and a very restrained pace.

We woke up the next day to a beautiful day, warm by winter standards in Tasmania. Breakfast in bed was only improved by the sun pouring into the tent. the morning was spent sitting on the beach, swimming (yes in a Tassie winter) and eating some fresh fruit. before retracing our steps at around 11am and enjoying lunch back at the Coles Bay bakery. A very pleasant trip to relax before returning to the corporate jungle.

La Sportiva Garnet GTX

La Sportiva Garnet GTX

Well the time has come swap out my old pair of boots which were also La Sportiva’s but I cant remember the model. Heavy full grain leather boots which lasted me eight years and sold me on the quality of this brand. So I headed to Melbourne with my tax return in my hand and feet pointed to little Bourke street.

I wont go into the full spec’s of the boot which can be found here Sportiva.com

I found the boots very comfortable straight out of the box and managed to wear them on a day walk three days after purchasing them. The walk was a snowy bash up the south wellington track, across wellington plateau to the summit and then down via the road. With 15-20cm of fresh snow on the ground I was expecting to end up with wet feet at some point during the day and I also packed the blister kit just in case. I was very happy to get home that evening with dry feet that were completely blister free. The Vibram soles provided plenty of traction on a slippery track and at no point were my feet cold.

I would recommend upgrading the innersole of the boot as its a tad thin.
All in all I was very happy with my purchase and hope to get another eight years out of these ones.

Charged by Fire

I came across this today and thought its was a great idea. not sure how it would go in our parks systems fuel stove only areas.

Mike Apsey

Mikie likes it and so may you. I also like what this company is doing.

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